6 Simple Ways to  Keep your Brain Healthy and Reduce your risk of Alzheimer’s Disease

20

SEPTEMBER, 2017

Alzheimer’s
Dementia
Life

What is Alzheimer’s disease?
Alzheimer’s disease is a dementia. Dementia results in a loss of memory, a change in behaviour and a change in personality. Late-onset Alzheimer’s dementia, is the most common cause of dementia. There are several other causes of dementia, including Frontotemporal dementia, Lewy Body disease, Parkinson’s disease, AIDS, syphilis and chronic alcohol use.

Why should you care?
The illness is increasing world-wide. There are currently 46,8 million people living with Alzheimer’s currently. This number is expected to increase to 75 million people by 2030 (World Alzheimer’s report, 2015). You may already know someone with dementia. Despite extensive research, there is no cure for this illness. There is also a misconception that nothing can be done to help, but there is now increasing evidence that up to 50% of cases of this illness may be due to modifiable risk factors (Barnes et al, 2011). You can reduce your risk of dementia and keep your brain healthy by living well.

Alzheimer’s Disease

What can you do?
There are six simple ways to reduce your risk of Alzheimer’s disease.

1. Sleep well
During sleep harmful substances, such as amyloid are removed from the brain. Amyloid is thought to lead to Alzheimer’s dementia.
(Health professionals click here)

2. Eat less sugar and less saturated fats
Refined sugar and excess saturated fat damages your brain, leading to problems with memory and other cognitive skills.
(Health professionals click here)

3. Don’t smoke
Smoking leads to many health problems, including dementia. Smoking affects not just memory but also learning, processing information, reasoning and attention.
(Health professionals click here)

“Spend time with people you love”

4. Spend time with people you love
Spending time with people you love actually changes your brain, promoting growth in a part of the brain important in memory, the hippocampus.
(Health professionals click here)

5. Exercise
Exercise protects the brain, in part by increasing plasticity of the brain and reducing harmful chemicals in the brain.
(Health professionals click here)

6. Stimulate your brain
Stimulating your brain, allows it to grow and develop and increases it’s reserve capacity.
(Health professionals click here)

Alzheimer’s Disease

It’s really that simple. Learn how each of these help your brain and what you can do from Memorability’s ‘Protecting Memory’ series. (Health professionals click here)

Linking Disclaimer: The Alzheimer’s Association is not responsible for information or advice provided by others, including information on websites that link to Association sites and on third party sites to which the Association links. Please direct any questions to weblink@alz.org.

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